Html Faq's
First, label the destination of the link. The old way to label the destination of the link was with an anchor using the NAME attribute. For example:
<h2><a name="section2">Section 2: Beyond Introductions</a></h2>

The modern way to label the destination of the link is with an ID attribute. For example:
<h2 id="section2">Section 2: Beyond Introductions</h2>

Second, link to the labeled destination. The URL is the URL of the document, with "#" and the value of the NAME or ID attribute appended. Continuing the above examples, elsewhere in the same document you could use:
<a href="#section2">go to Section 2</a>

Similarly, in another document you could use:
<a href="thesis.html#section2">go to Section 2 of my thesis</a>
Use an anchor element. The HREF attribute specifies the URL of the document that you want to link to. The following example links the text "Web Authoring FAQ" to <URL:>:
    <A HREF="">Web Authoring FAQ</A>
    How do I create a link that opens a new window?
    <a target="_blank" href=...> opens a new, unnamed window.
    <a target="example" href=...> opens a new window named "example", provided that a window or frame by that name does not already exist.
    Note that the TARGET attribute is not part of HTML 4 Strict. In HTML 4 Strict, new windows can be created only with JavaScript. links that open new windows can be annoying to your readers if there is not a good reason for them.
    How do I let people download a file from my page?
    Once the file is uploaded to the server, you need only use an anchor reference tag to link to it. An example would be:
    <a href="../files/">Download Foo Now! (100kb ZIP)</a>
<div>This is best done with a small form:<br><br><form action="[URL]" method="GET"><br><br><input value="Text on button" type="submit"><br></form><br><br>If you want to line up buttons next to each other, you will have to put them in a one-row table, with each button in a separate cell.<br>Note that search engines might not find the target document unless there is a normal link somewhere else on the page.<br>A go-to-other-page button can also be coded in JavaScript, but the above is standard HTML and works for more readers.<div></div></div>
Rather than a normal submit button (<input type="submit" ...>), you can use the image input type (<input type="image" ...>). The image input type specifies a graphical submit button that functions like a server-side image map.

Unlike normal submit buttons (which return a name=value pair), the image input type returns the x-y coordinates of the location where the user clicked on the image. The browser returns the x-y coordinates as name.x=000 and name.y=000 pairs.

For compatability with various non-graphical browsing environments, the VALUE and ALT attributes should be set to the same value as the NAME attribute. For example:

<input type="image" name="Send" alt="Send" value="Send" src="send-button.gif">

For the reset button, one could use <button type="reset" ...>, JavaScript, and/or style sheets, although none of these mechanisms work universally.
There is no way in standard HTML to specify where page breaks will occur when printing a page. HTML was designed to be a device-independent structural definition language, and page breaks depend on things like the fonts and paper size that the person viewing the page is using.
Removing the border around frames involves both not drawing the frame borders and eliminating the space between the frames. The most widely supported way to display borderless frames is <FRAMESET ... BORDER=0 FRAMEBORDER=0 FRAMESPACING=0>. 
Note that these attributes are proprietary and not part of the HTML 4.01 specifications. (HTML 4.01 does define the FRAMEBORDER attribute for the FRAME element, but not for the FRAMESET element.) Also, removing the border around a frame makes it difficult to resize it, as this border is also used in most GUIs to change the size of the frame.
In short, there is no real method or script for making standard HTML source code not viewable. You may consider doing any of the below if they are concerned about your source code.

1. Create the web page in Macromedia Flash or a similar program. The visitor would need to download the Macromedia Flash plug-in and would be unable to view the source code for the flash applet.
2. There are various scripts that will disable the right click feature, preventing the user from saving images or viewing the source. However, this will not protect the source code of your page. For example, Internet Explorer users may still click "View" and "Source" to view the source code of the page, or a user could disable scripts and images can be saved by simply saving the web page to the hard drive.
3. There are several programs that will help scramble your code, making it difficult (not impossible) to read. Again, this is not going to prevent someone from viewing your code.
You're probably looking at the wrong part of the screen. The Title usually shows up in the Title Bar on the Window, to the left of the minimize/maximize buttons on graphical browsers.
Thumbnails are very useful, but they take a little bit of time to make. All you need is a graphics editing program that has functions to resize an image (sometimes it's under a function called image attributes). Be advised--when you have made a thumbnail, you will need to save it as something different than the original. Also, you will generally want to link to the larger graphic when you are done.

Here are the steps:
1. Load a copy of the image into your graphics editing program.
2. Determine the ratio the thumbnail to be. (Do you want it to be half the size? One third of the size? One quarter of the size? One tenth of the size?)
3. Find the resize (or change attributes) function of your program. Most programs will recogize a percentage, for example you can type in 25% for height and width if you want the thumbnail to be a quarter of the size. (It it doesn't do percentages, you can calculate it by multiplying the pixels by the percentage. If you have a graphic that is 400 by 100, and you want it 25% of the size, multiple each measurement by .25. In this case, you'll get 100 and 25.)
4. Once you are satisfied with the thumbnail, think of a name for the image. Choose Save As and enter that name. (Tip: I like to just add t after the image name. For taco.jpg I'd use tacot.jpg)
5. Upload the image to your site, and edit your HTML to load the new image name with the new, smaller size. If you wish, you can link to the larger image around the image.

Example: You have taco.jpg which is 400 pixels wide and 100 pixels high. You made a thumbnail of it called tacot.jpg, which is now 100 pixels wide and 25 pixels high. After you have both images uploaded, here's the code:

<a href="taco.jpg"><img src="tacot.jpg" width=100 height=25 border=0 alt="click for larger taco"></a> 
You'll find border=0 to be helpful in eliminating a link-colored box around your thumbnail.
The method parameter specifies which method the client is using to send information to the WEB server. The method determines which parameter you will find the CGI request data in:

* POST - post_args
* GET - httpargs